The Swim Professor

Jim Reiser, M.S.

Freestyle Kick Games for Kids

Do your students ever get bored, or even lazy while you’re having them practice their freestyle kick in swim lessons? Here’s a fun little game you can incorporate called “Cat and Mouse” that has proven to be both MOTIVATIONAL and FUN! 

For more detailed instructions on “How to Teach the Freestyle and Backstroke,” check out our “SWIM STROKES 201/202/203” video course!

The International Swimming Hall of Fame has named Jim Reiser the recipient of the 2015 Virginia Hunt Newman Award for his curriculum and approach in teaching infants, toddlers, and children to swim.  Jim is the first American to win the award in 10 years.

If you would like to learn more about the Swim Lessons University certification program and curriculum, make sure to visit us at www.SwimLessonsUniversity.com  We have training and certification programs designed for both private instructors as well as organizations like YMCAs, Recreation Departments, Athletic Clubs, and more.

The Swim Lessons University Instructor certification is an internationally recognized alternative to the Red Cross WSI. And when you utilize SLU, you can even SPECIALIZE to teach in specific courses or you can certify to teach then all! Best of all, when you choose Swim Lessons University you can do all your training at your own facility or in the comfort of your own home, at your pace, and at a fraction of the cost!

Swim Lessons University is currently being utilized by recreation departments, YMCAs, America Camp Association swim lessons programs, as well as by private swimming instructors in 45 states and over 30 countries!

You can also call us toll free at 1-866-498-SWIM (7946).

 

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October 5, 2016 at 2:38 am Comments (0)

Learning the Freestyle Kick

Dear Swim Professor:

How would I get a beginning swimmer to kick properly with the kick board? I used the kinesthetic feedback and manipulated their legs for them. I even had swim lessons student show me the difference between good and bad kicks, but they reverted right back to kicking with their legs up under their body.   I appreciate any help you can give me.

Coach Arielle

Dear Coach Arielle,

Quite frankly, it sounds like you are doing a lot of great things.  You obviously studied the “Foundations of Teaching Video Course” In fact, you are incorporating some of the best techniques available.  In today’s blog, I will go over some fundamentals that may help you.  But before I do that, allow me to say this:

Making technique changes or breaking bad habits, whether it be learning to kick properly or correcting someone’s golf swing, is typically a process, not an event.

So when you practice all these excellent teaching techniques, i.e., the “right vs. wrong way,” kinesthetic feedback, demonstrations, etc., all it does is improves their ability to get it right sooner, but those corrections are rarely instantaneous.   This is why two of the most important characteristics teacher’s have are “patience and persistence.” Don’t give up on your students and keep coming back to it, while being positive, reassuring, and encouraging all the while.   You also have to sell to them that “they will get it.”  You have to help your students BELIEVE.   You know the saying: “if you can believe it, you can achieve it.”   That’s the first step.

From a technical aspect, here are a few other questions that I would have  that will make learning the flutter kick easier:

1.  Are the arms extended straight? (you want the arms straight)

2.  Is the chin near the water?  (it’s important that it is near the water)

3.  Are the arms on top of the board? (they should be)

4.  Are the thumbs on top, fingers on the bottom? (they should be)

5.  Is the student pressing down on the board and sinking it?  (you don’t want that)

6.  Is the student on top of the board? (you don’t want that)

Once your beginning swimming student is holding the board correctly, then you want to make sure you are doing the following ( I know you were doing many of these):

1.  Demonstrate it correctly and have your students watch something specific, i.e., watch how my legs are extended almost straight behind me, not under me).

2.  Use good cues:   I want to see “Small, fast kicks!”  “Fast feet!”

3.  Demonstrate the “right vs. the wrong way:”  Watch how my kicks are small and fast, and watch how my legs are extended behind me.”  Now watch me kick incorrectly.  See how I don’t go anywhere when me knees draw underneath me?”

4.  Kinesthetic Feedback:  Like you were saying, let them feel it done right, wrong, then right again.  Also, try placing your forearm underneath the legs just above the knees to prevent the knees from drawing forward.

5.  Practice, Practice, Practice.   Even though we don’t like to see skills practiced incorrectly, in many instances, that is the only way the learner will learn to get it right.   When your student starts to feel the difference between doing the skill correctly vs. incorrectly, this will encourage them make that change for good.

Hope that helps, coach!

The International Swimming Hall of Fame has named Jim Reiser the recipient of the 2015 Virginia Hunt Newman Award for his curriculum and approach in teaching infants, toddlers, and children to swim.  Jim was the first American to win the award in 10 years.

If you would like to learn more about the Swim Lessons University certification program and curriculum, make sure to visit us at www.SwimLessonsUniversity.com 

We have training and certification programs designed for both private instructors as well as organizations like YMCAs, Recreation Departments, Athletic Clubs, and more.

Swim Lessons University is currently being utilized by recreation departments, YMCAs, America Camp Association swim lessons programs, as well as by private swimming instructors in 45 states and over 30 countries!

You can also call us toll free at 1-866-498-SWIM (7946).

 

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July 20, 2011 at 9:15 pm Comments (0)

Swim School Ideas

As we prepared to get nearly 100 second graders in the water yesterday, many of whom have NEVER been in the water before (believe it or not), I did something I wanted to share with you that you may enjoy. In fact, you may want to try it next time you have a large swim lessons group as it had every child engaged:

After dividing up the 100 swim lessons students into three time slots, with about 33 swimmers per half hour, we gathered the first group on deck. With five instructors in the water, I had created five single file lines with an average of 6-7 children per line. I was about to have the instructors do a freestyle kick demonstration in the prone kick position (also known as the in-line kick). This is the second of two tests we do (first test: kick with a noodle or kick board with the face out of the water). This test determines what group we are going to place the students. One other note, 95% of the children are African American, and I’d estimate up to 50% of them have never been in a swimming pool.

So I say to the kids: “Someday when you grow up (like when your 21 or 22 or 23 years old) and my swim teachers are old and gray and retired, I would love to have some of you in here teaching swim lessons for me! So today we’re going to do a little role playing and pretend you are the teacher for a minute and see how well you do. Let’s imagine the swim instructors are your students taking swim lessons from you. I’m going to tell you softly what to say, repeat after me: Arms straight (arms straight), fast kick (fast kick), face in the water (face in the water), ready-go (ready-go)!”

It was such a neat thing to hear those 2nd graders pretend they were the swim teacher and to see the teachers do what they said. I even think it reminded the teachers how effective choral responding is and how important start signals are in their own teaching. There was no question what those kids playing the role of swim teachers wanted their teachers to do!

So there you have it:  a quick little swim school idea that that was fun for the kids and good for the swim lesson instructors too!

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September 28, 2010 at 4:29 pm Comments (0)