The Swim Professor

Jim Reiser, M.S.

Kiddie Pool and Water Park Safety

Here is a short video covering critical water safety tips for toddlers and young children.  For more on drowning prevention, check out these Water Safety DVD’s.

 

https://youtu.be/FBKmkk6yjU8

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May 1, 2012 at 5:07 pm Comments (0)

Aquatic Safety Research Group’s Rachel Griffith’s has Article Published

Rachel Griffith’s wrote a fabulous article on water safety which was published by Westside Today. Please read and share! Your sharing of this article could save a life.

For more great water safety tools and products, especially the Coast Guard Approved Sea Squirts Lifejacket, which is designed for swimming–check out Swim Lessons University today!

The International Swimming Hall of Fame has named Jim Reiser the recipient of the 2015 Virginia Hunt Newman Award for his curriculum and approach in teaching infants, toddlers, and children to swim.  Jim was the first American to win the award in 10 years.

If you would like to learn more about the Swim Lessons University certification program and curriculum, make sure to visit us at www.SwimLessonsUniversity.com 

We have training and certification programs designed for both private instructors as well as organizations like YMCAs, Recreation Departments, Athletic Clubs, and more.

Swim Lessons University is currently being utilized by recreation departments, YMCAs, America Camp Association swim lessons programs, as well as by private swimming instructors in 45 states and over 30 countries!

You can also call us toll free at 1-866-498-SWIM (7946).

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April 10, 2012 at 11:49 am Comments (0)

Water Smart 101 – A Water Safety Lesson being Taught in Public Schools

After presenting this water safety lesson to nearly 10,000 children last year, and over 50,000 children in the past 6 years, I can now share it with you!   You can find the “Water Smart 101 DVD on the Swim Lessons University website today!

Whether you are a swimming instructor or a school teacher—Water Smart 101 is a program you can easily adapt and teach in the schools (not in pools) in an effort to save lives by educating our youth before they are let out for the summer.

Water Smart 101 was inspired by South Carolina State Representative Wendell Gilliard, who reached out to me last year to create the program. Representative Gilliard proposed a bill in South Carolina that requires one hour of Water Safety Instruction in the classroom in every elementary school in the state.

This DVD is part of an entire curriculum which consists of this DVD, lesson plans, a homework assignment, and exam. The homework features a Water Safety Promise that both the child and parent(s) study together, discuss together, and sign together. The content of the Water Safety Promise is then reviewed in the next day’s lesson, which is followed by a written exam.

By the time children enter kindergarten, they are old enough to understand both the pleasures and risks involved with the water. To be truly successful, I think it is critical that we not only teach the children how they can keep themselves safer, but also involve their parents.  Parents are obviously a vital link in the overall plan, as they can further reinforce the importance of this water safety education and you can include them by having them participate in the homework assignment and sign the Water Safety Promise.

You will never be able to drownproof a child, but you can teach them to be 100% Water Smart!” If all of our children are 100% water smart–here’s no telling how many lives will be spared.

My goal is to help you make teaching water safety in the classroom both effective and as easy as 1-2-3.  As we get into the content of Water Smart 101 DVD course, I’m breaking it down and sharing with you what you can do to make your lesson engaging, fun, and effective.  The presentation on the video was a LIVE presentation that I did at a local elementary school in South Carolina, while incorporating tips to help you re-produce the same presentation.

There is also a bonus section that allows school teachers to simply put the DVD in and PLAY IT for their classroom.   In that part of the DVD, I spoke to the camera and did the presentation so the teachers don’t have to do it.  They can simply put it in the DVD player and press “play!”     I assume swim school owners and swim instructors will likely learn how to do the presentation and do it presentation themselves, which we teach in the video too!.

The International Swimming Hall of Fame has named Jim Reiser the recipient of the 2015 Virginia Hunt Newman Award for his curriculum and approach in teaching infants, toddlers, and children to swim.  Jim was the first American to win the award in 10 years.

If you would like to learn more about the Swim Lessons University certification program and curriculum, make sure to visit us at www.SwimLessonsUniversity.com 

We have training and certification programs designed for both private instructors as well as organizations like YMCAs, Recreation Departments, Athletic Clubs, and more.

Swim Lessons University is currently being utilized by recreation departments, YMCAs, America Camp Association swim lessons programs, as well as by private swimming instructors in 45 states and over 30 countries!

You can also call us toll free at 1-866-498-SWIM (7946).

 

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December 6, 2011 at 10:30 am Comments (2)

Swimming Pool Fencing – Water Safety for Children and Homeowner’s Swimming Pool Liability

According to SafeKids Worldwide, 50% – 90% of all drownings and near-drownings in backyard pools would be prevented if a four-sided isolation fence was installed.

Amazingly, also according to SafeKids Worldwide, only four states (CA, AZ, FL, and OR) require some type of fencing around residential pools.   FENCING SHOULD BE MANDATORY IN EVERY STATE.   Don’t agree with me?  Ask Jo-Ann Morris.  Ask Michelle Zieg.

Every residential pool should be fenced in… period!   If children reside in the home or will ever visit, four-sided fencing is a must!  In addition, while it is not substitute for fencing or supervision, every child should learn to swim.  Self-closing gates and pool alarms like the SAFETY TURTLE should also be used.  Every parent should follow the Safer 3.

Eric Probst, an attorney at the Law Firm of Porzio, Bromberg and Newman in Morristown, NJ has represented the swimming pool industry for over ten years.  While he states clearly this message does NOT constitute legal advice, he comments:  “I can tell you that a pool fence is definitely not a luxury.  Fencing in your backyard pool is about safety. Child drowning issues are paramount for the builder and homeowner alike.  Children are too often injured who have parents with the best intentions of keeping them.” As for  liability, no hard-fast rules exist for imposing liability on a homeowner. Each case turns on the status of the person injured (trespasser, invitee, guest) and the facts of the case. Whether a state where a drowning occurs requires the pool owner to have a fence around the pool or not, would be but one fact for the court and jury to consider when evaluating whether the homeowner is responsible for the child’s drowning. There are many other facts that could exist that would affect the ultimate liability determination.

Several other experts have weighed in as well:

Rebecca Wear Robinson • Pool fencing can only be considered a luxury by people who don’t understand why fencing is needed. Indoor plumbing was considered a luxury as well – and people became sick and died from contaminated water sources (and still do in many areas). The bigger issue is communicating to everyone why a pool fence is no different from seat belts and car seats in cars – we have to teach children how to be safe for their whole life, but while they are learning we have to help keep them safe. A pool without a fence is no different from sending a 2-year old off to preschool with a cheery wave, hoping they figure traffic patterns successfully.

Jim Reiser • Rebecca is absolutely right! Fences around public pools are a requirement, and they should be for residential as well. No fence?  No pool!  It should be law!  Whether it’s selfishness or ignorance, the lack of fencing around residential pools is basically killing innocent babies, toddlers, and young children. The homeowner, I would assume would not only be extremely liable if a child drown in their pool, they would have to live with that for the rest of their life.

Jeff Steers • I believe a pool fence is not a luxury, in terms of either safety or facility financial considerations.

It is my understanding (and I’ve been wrong before) that here in Indiana, a fence is required around pools in residential areas but not legally necessary in rural areas. I could be cynical and suggest the residential requirement is more for liability regarding the neighbor kids rather than legislating good parenting skills for the homeowner’s own children, but again, I could be wrong.

If we had a residential pool when our sons were toddlers, we certainly would have had a fence, not around the backyard, but the pool itself. We know how quickly very young children can escape even the best parental monitoring and supervision, and constantly hear news reports about how that has ended with a drowning in their own home pool.

Changing gears, what is the additional expense of installing a fence at a facility compared to the huge liability expense should an incident occur? And I would presume that the absence of a fence would create a larger ongoing liability expense in terms of increased premiums.

When I say liability expense, I am also speaking in terms of moral and ethical liability as well as financial. First, who wants to be known as the Drowning Place? Second, and more importantly, do we not have a caring responsibility toward our fellow human beings to prevent access when rescue staff are not available? To be even more melodramatic, not installing a fence around a pool is like the Titanic builders saying, “Ah, we don’t need so many lifeboats…”

I agree; I see a pool fence as not only very important, but as near necessity.

Don Coppedge • I’m glad we are on the same page. As someone in my line of work, I can’t tell you how many times I have come across misinformed consumers who do not think they can ever become victims of an accident; therefore, don’t need a pool fence.

I hope this blog will serve as a means to prevent childhood drowning.

Please feel free to add your comments too.  If you are pro-fencing—I will approve them!

The International Swimming Hall of Fame has named Jim Reiser the recipient of the 2015 Virginia Hunt Newman Award for his curriculum and approach in teaching infants, toddlers, and children to swim.  Jim is the first American to win the award in 10 years.

If you would like to learn more about the Swim Lessons University Online Swim Instructor Certification  and curriculum, make sure to visit us at www.SwimLessonsUniversity.com

Swim Lessons University is currently being utilized by recreation departments, YMCAs, America Camp Association swim lessons programs, as well as by private swimming instructors in 45 states and over 30 countries!

You can also call us toll free at 1-866-498-SWIM (7946).

 

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October 18, 2011 at 4:26 pm Comments (3)

Swim Lesson Questions

Last night one of my instructors got this question/comment from a parent:

“I don’t see why she has to learn to breathe to the side… I think it’s just fine to breathe to front.”

Wow!   That just shows why the majority of our swim lessons participants are “beginners” and not near enough parents know enough, understand enough, or value enough the importance of learning formal strokes like freestyle with SIDE BREATHING!

To me,  when I see a person swimming freestyle with side breathing, I think to myself: “this individual knows how to swim.”   On the other hand, when I see someone swimming like Tarzan (though he was the best of yesteryear), I think: “this person is not a good swimmer.”

Not to get off subject, but an interesting fact.  Johnny Weismuller (Tarzan) was the first human being to swim the 100 yard freestyle in under 1 minute.   A great accomplishment considering the lack of technique and training available back then.  But today, we have countless 12 year olds swimming the 100 freestyle under 1:00!  So we now have skinny little kids who could out race a super human with hands the size of a pizza.   Johnny Weismuller is from Windber, PA, 5 minutes from my hometown.  My grandfather actually shook his hand and told me that story of how large his hands were!

Back to the importance of swimming freestyle with side breathing.   When one breathes to the side instead of the front, a significant amount of energy is conserved and the stroke is much more efficient and minimizes frontal drag.   If you train freestyle, you could swim across most lakes.   Of course learning other strokes such as sidestroke and elementary backstroke are great strokes to conserve energy for long swims as well.

According to Safe Kids World Wide, over 50% of all drownings for children ages 6 -14 occur in open water situations.   Why?  One reason is parents don’t understand the importance of learning formal strokes, such as the parent who questioned my instructor.   So when it appears to many parents that their child “swim like fish” because of how they swim  in a pool, the parents have no idea how the child would respond in an open water situation where your skills need to be much stronger.   If children are given the opportunity to learn “formal swimming skills and strokes,” drowning rates would drastically decline.

And one last note, life jackets save lives too.   Depending on the child’s skills, parents should not just depend on swimming skills in open water situations.   My rule of thumb, if the child (or adult) can’t swim across the lake, he/she should wear a life jacket!

The International Swimming Hall of Fame has named Jim Reiser the recipient of the 2015 Virginia Hunt Newman Award for his curriculum and approach in teaching infants, toddlers, and children to swim.  Jim was the first American to win the award in 10 years.

If you would like to learn more about the Swim Lessons University certification program and curriculum, make sure to visit us at www.SwimLessonsUniversity.com 

We have training and certification programs designed for both private instructors as well as organizations like YMCAs, Recreation Departments, Athletic Clubs, and more.

Swim Lessons University is currently being utilized by recreation departments, YMCAs, America Camp Association swim lessons programs, as well as by private swimming instructors in 45 states and over 30 countries!

You can also call us toll free at 1-866-498-SWIM (7946).

 

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July 6, 2011 at 2:22 pm Comments (0)

LIFE JACKETS SAVE LIVES

Today’s blog is a response to a post against the use of Life jackets and Flotation devices.  Here are my thoughts:

First off, Life Jackets save lives. An absolute MUST for non-swimmers in residential pools and lakes, especially if they are not within arm’s reach of an adult.  I think most would agree that a child’s life itself is more precious than any philosophy or an unjustified concern about a child becoming dependent on the device.  I have been using various flotation devices since in 1982.  I have never witnessed a child a child not learn how to swim because of using a flotation device.  In fact, I learned to swim with a flotation device myself, as did my sisters and brother, as did hundreds of All Americans, World Class Swimmers, and yes–Olympians.   It didn’t stop them!

As Tom Griffiths, founder of the “Note ‘n Float” program said to me at the NDPA Conference in Pittsburgh last year, “With Iphones, Ipads, texting, etc., the supervision is getting worse.”

For instructional purposes, I have been using the progressive SwimWays Power Swimr since the early 90’s. Children learn independence in the water because they are not dependent on the teacher’s support, their confidence grows, and REAL practice time AND repetition of movements FAR EXCEEDS whatever the child would get without it.

Not only do I witness it first hand on a daily basis at The Swim Lessons Company, while obtaining my Master’s Degree in Physical Education and Motor Learning we studied skill acquisition in depth.  Study after study suggests that increased practice time leads to faster skill development.  In addition, because you can gradually decrease the flotation with this device, you can apply the progression principle naturally which also accelerates learning (a well known physiology principle).

With that said, I do respect other philosophies on learn to swim and I commend all those who teach children to swim and give them the lifetime gift of learning to swim.  There is no one way to achieve any one goal, but when it comes to safety for non-swimmers,–there’s no debate—LIFE JACKETS SAVE LIVES!

The International Swimming Hall of Fame has named Jim Reiser the recipient of the 2015 Virginia Hunt Newman Award for his curriculum and approach in teaching infants, toddlers, and children to swim.  Jim was the first American to win the award in 10 years.

If you would like to learn more about the Swim Lessons University certification program and curriculum, make sure to visit us at www.SwimLessonsUniversity.com 

We have training and certification programs designed for both private instructors as well as organizations like YMCAs, Recreation Departments, Athletic Clubs, and more.

Swim Lessons University is currently being utilized by recreation departments, YMCAs, America Camp Association swim lessons programs, as well as by private swimming instructors in 45 states and over 30 countries!

You can also call us toll free at 1-866-498-SWIM (7946).

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May 17, 2011 at 4:08 pm Comments (2)

Water Safety for Kids

Today’s blog is to announce a podcast that I just recorded and published called “Water Safety for Kids,” with one purpose: To reach as many parents as possible and potentially save the life of a child. The purpose of the podcast is not only to prevent unnecessary drowning and teach water safety, but to prevent and recognize how devastating nonfatal drownings can be as well.

I have dedicated this podcast to Samual Morris. Samual Morris did survive a nonfatal drowning, but today he suffers from a hypoxic brain injury causing a lifelong disability. His mother Jo-ann writes, “there is no cure for my child.”

Nonfatal drowning can occur in seconds causing brain damage that may result in long-term disabilities, including memory problems, learning disabilities, and permanent loss of basic functioning.

The podcast, Water Safety for Kids, challenges parents, in fact, begs parents to NEVER underestimate how easy it is for a child to find himself in a life or death situation in the water. Please join me in our fight against drowning and share this water safety podcast with as many parents as possible. Together we CAN make a difference and save the life of a child.

 

The International Swimming Hall of Fame has named Jim Reiser the recipient of the 2015 Virginia Hunt Newman Award for his curriculum and approach in teaching infants, toddlers, and children to swim.  Jim was the first American to win the award in 10 years.

If you would like to learn more about the Swim Lessons University certification program and curriculum, make sure to visit us at www.SwimLessonsUniversity.com 

We have training and certification programs designed for both private instructors as well as organizations like YMCAs, Recreation Departments, Athletic Clubs, and more.

Swim Lessons University is currently being utilized by recreation departments, YMCAs, America Camp Association swim lessons programs, as well as by private swimming instructors in 45 states and over 30 countries!

You can also call us toll free at 1-866-498-SWIM (7946).

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November 23, 2010 at 7:56 pm Comment (1)

Do You have the Thunderstorm Blues? Swim Lessons, Swim Safety, and Customer Service

One of the most frustrating things for parents, swim teachers, and swim school owners to deal during Summer Swim Lessons is thunderstorms.  Parents get mad when we cancel, parents get mad when we don’t.  As a parent, I am certainly sympathetic.  I know how hard it is to get my three children in the car, go to the pool, and then have to disappoint them that they can’t swim.

I often encourage parents to take lessons with us in the fall, winter, and spring when thunderstorms are less likely.  Mornings and early evening time slots (before 6PM) prove to be less likely to have storms than the later evening times.  My personal experience over the years is that storms tend to roll in between 6-6:30PM most often, and July seems to be the biggest month for thunderstorms.  If I was a gambler and could win lots of money predicting storms, I think I would head to Las Vegas and retire young.  I am not a gambler, though.  I am a swim teacher.  I am a swim school owner, and my family depends on you taking swimming lessons with us (even in July)—so please don’t stop enrolling!

I have been in this business for over 20 years and I experience it every summer.  There is no full proof solution for the problem, including the weather channel and forecasts and even radar, which are right some of the time and wrong some of the time, and we are looking at them when we are trying to make the right decision.   We recently had to cancel class when there was an isolated storm that hung over just one of our 8 locations, and to make matters worse that happened two nights in a row for the 6:30 class.  According to the local weather the night before, the chance of thunderstorms was 0%!   Then there are days when the weather calls for an 80% chance of storms and we get nothing.  While there are few exceptions, we can only occasionally make a decision to cancel for the night an hour or so before classes start based on the weather forecast.

As teachers and swim schools, we can’t control “mother nature.  Fortunately many summer thunderstorms pass over quickly.  For instance, last night by 7:15 pm the storm that had me cancel my 6 & 6:30 class had passed and I was able to coach my swim team kids without a problem.  That’s why on many evenings it’s better to  take a “wait and see” approach the storms often pass over when it seems like there is no hope.  But there’s no way to know how long.  Sometimes it’s 15-20 minutes, sometimes it’s 45 minutes, others it’s an hour or more.

You can also go to most any summer league swim meet and see similar “wait and see” approaches being taken because these storms do pass, and kids will be all over the deck.   You see this often too at neighborhood and residential pools.   What’s most dangerous is being wet on the deck without shoes and not under cover.   Yet I’ve seen countless pools over the years where guards get kids out of the pool but they’re hanging around the pool in bear feet, sometimes even near the side splashing the water.  This is clearly unsafe.

My research tells me the best thing to do if lightning is near is to seek shelter and clear the pool deck which is what we do.   By the way, as far as I know there has never been a person stuck and killed in an indoor pool. I can’t find statistics specifically on outdoor pools.  According to the National Lightning Safety Institute, lightning studies from NOAA over a 35-year period are not detailed and show only generalized activities or locations of lightning victims as below:

  • Open fields/ballparks = 26.8%
  • Under trees = 13.7%
  • Water related (fishing/boating/swimming) = 8.1%
  • Golfing = 3.9%
  • Driving machinery = 3.0%
  • Telephone-related = 2.4%
  • Radios/antennas = 0.7%
  • All others/unknown categories = 40.4%

Statistics also show that one’s chances of being struck by lightning are .34 in one million.

Back to what we do as a swim school when it comes to cancellations, thunderstorms, and customer service.

First we have a cancellation hotline set up which is 803-561-0226.  The moment we decide to cancel classes at a given location I announce it on the hotline.  I usually also announce the make up schedule.   On occasion, if we have multiple cancellations, I will refer our parents to our website for the make up schedule.

As far as make-ups and rescheduling, etc., we offer the following options:

1.  A scheduled make-up class at the same time on a designated day of the week, i.e., Friday, which we currently keep open for make-ups.  In fact, in our outdoor locations, we keep Thursday and Friday open because of the likelihood of cancellations.

2.  If that doesn’t work out, our customers can schedule make-ups just prior to the second week or back half of a session once we are done actively registering new students.  I want to always maintain the integrity of the student: teacher ratios and that’s why we’d need to wait until the back half of the session.

3.  Our customers can take a credit that has no expiration date and use it against any future swim class, including the fall and winter when storms are as not likely to occur.

The last thing we want to do is risk anyone’s safety.  Again, this is the reason we send children and parents to their cars at our outdoor locations to take cover.  We don’t allow anyone on the pool deck if there is a storm close

If we cancelled lessons every time there are isolated or scattered storms in the forecast, no one would ever learn to swim.   We would literally lose half the summer.   Fortunately, most of these storms come and go.

Lastly, and maybe most importantly, I want every parent to know this:  YOU HAVE EVERY RIGHT, AND I RESPECT WHATEVER DECISION YOU MAKE, WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR CHILD’S SAFETY.  I RESPECT A PARENT’S DECISION 100% if they decide that he/she doesn’t want to put their child back in the water after we determined a storm has passed.  I am always happy to honor a make-up, reschedule, etc.  Any of the alternatives I mentioned above.

I am in the business of water safety and have been my whole life.  It is my passion to make children safer in and around the water.   When we decide to get back in the water because the storm has appeared to have passed, nevertheless, it is still a judgment call, and your judgment for your child is the only one that matters.

But I will leave all my readers at this.   My rule of thumb is to make the same judgment call for my customers as I would for my own children.

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July 26, 2010 at 7:20 pm Comments (0)

2010 DROWNING PREVENTION AWARD WINNERS ANNOUNCED

2010 DROWNING PREVENTION AWARD WINNERS ANNOUNCED

HUNTINGTON BEACH, Calif.— April 21, 2010 The National Drowning Prevention Alliance (NDPA) recognized national and community drowning prevention leaders on April 26, 2010 at the NDPA’s 9th Annual National Drowning Prevention Symposium at the Sheraton Station Square in Pittsburgh, PA.

Cecilia Duer will receive the 2010 National Lighthouse Award, the NDPA’s highest honor.  Duer, executive director of the National Water Safety Congress since 2002, was selected for her leadership in water safety and drowning prevention. She also serves as the executive director of the Spirit of America Foundation and directs its youth education programs, and is involved in other national organizations dedicated to aquatic safety including the National Boating Safety Advisory; NASBLA Education Committee; Ohio DNR Division of Watercraft; and the NWSC Rescue Recover, Re-Warm and PWC courses.

NDPA Executive Director Kristin Goffman says, “Cecilia is a true leader in this effort, managing numerous national projects.  Her work in critical areas of water safety education has advanced drowning prevention efforts across the nation. She is a leading force in water safety, and she was selected by the NDPA board because she embodies the spirit of this award.”

Previous Lighthouse Award winners were Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz and Nancy Baker, whose tireless efforts helped to achieve passage of national legislation, the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool & Spa Safety Act, named in memory of Baker’s daughter, who drowned through entrapment on a spa drain.

Four NDPA Community Lifesaver Awards will be presented. This award honors exceptional work in the advancement of drowning prevention at the community or regional level through education, research, public awareness, legislative changes, or engineering advancements.  Winners were peer-nominated and selected by the NDPA board based on set criteria.

Jim Reiser with Swim Lessons University was selected for his leadership in promoting drowning prevention in his local community of Columbia, South Carolina through a multi-faceted approach including swim instruction, water safety awareness, and media outreach.  Reiser designed an innovative water safety & swim proficiency awards program using a color-coded arm band system, incorporating various colors with different levels of swimming ability. He has partnered with USA Swimming’s Make a Splash Campaign, authored books for parents on water safety, and serves as the water safety chairperson for Safe Kids Midlands in Columbia.

Julian “Duke” Brown with Horry County School District was selected for his dedication to the prevention of drowning in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina.  For the past ten years, Brown has coordinated a Junior Lifeguard Program for 5th grade students that meets state curriculum standards and encompasses water safety information and practices. The program Brown developed promotes appreciation and understanding of local aquatic environments and helps students develop specific abilities to save lives in and out of the water, and to assist swimmers in distress. Over 500 students have completed this after-school program.

Gary Gray, a Vashon Aquatic Club swim parent and board member, was inspired by his then five-year-old son’s desire to become a diver after watching the 2004 Olympic Diving competition. Gray immediately got involved in local swim programs and Vashon Island’s only competitive swim team–the Seals.  In 2009, Washington State’s Vashon Aquatic Club offered the free program to over 300 first-through-third grade students. Goffman says, “His nominators said that Gary is a tireless champion of getting kids in the water, and realizes the need for safety around the water since his community lives on an island.  He spreads his passion for water safety by ensuring that all children have access to swim lessons.”

The San Diego County Aquatic Council, led by Manuel Gonzalez, aquatic director for the city of Chula Vista and Belinda Bencomo, supervising recreation specialist for the city of San Diego CA, has made furthering aquatic opportunities for San Diegans, water safety and drowning prevention priorities.  The Aquatic Council has a diverse membership ranging from all 17 municipalities in San Diego County to numerous public and private agencies, swimming and pool industry representatives, and interested individuals. The Aquatic Council works to provide lifeguards with the necessary tools to ensure that guarded waters are safe, and to educate the public to help reduce drowning in unguarded waters. The group has been on the forefront of local and national legislative action and is currently working with local health departments to help ensure that pool operators in San Diego comply with the Virginia Graeme Baker Pool & Spa Safety Act.  Goffman reports, “This council demonstrates that a community-based water safety coalition can make significant advances in drowning prevention within its local community.”

For further information, visit www.ndpa.org or call (951) 659-8600.

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About the National Drowning Prevention Alliance (NDPA)

The NDPA was formed in 2004 to maximize efforts to prevent drowning through the development and implementation of strategies to facilitate and improve education, public awareness, effective barrier codes and greater utilization of layers of protection. This tax-exempt, 501(c)(3) national organization is comprised of individuals, organizations, government agency representatives, policymakers and corporations who have the common goal of saving lives. Affiliated members and programs share “the best of the best” with other members so that successful efforts can be replicated nationwide, with a goal of reducing drowning in swimming pools, open bodies of water and household products such as tubs and buckets.

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May 3, 2010 at 6:23 pm Comments (0)

Will I see you at the National Drowning Prevention Symposium?

I will be heading up to my home state of Pennsylvania next weekend to attend the 9th Annual Drowning Prevention Symposium on April 26th and April 27th.  Many of my friends know that I am a Johnstown, PA native and did my undergraduate work at California University of PA, not to mention that I spent half my youth at swim meets in Pittsburgh!  At any rate,  I’m looking forward to visiting my family and friends on Friday and Saturday before heading to the NDPA event on Sunday.

If you are attending I look forward to you visiting with me.  I will have all my Swim Lessons University DVD’s, as well as my new Swim Lessons Awards Progression & Water Safety Bracelet system available at my exhibit. Mention this blog and I will give you an automatic 10% discount on any of the Swim Lessons University educational tools!

Hope to see you at the Sheraton at Station Square!

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April 16, 2010 at 5:00 pm Comments (0)

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