The Swim Professor

Jim Reiser, M.S.

How to Teach a Water Safety Lesson to Children without a pool!

from wikiHow – The How to Manual That You Can Edit

How can you teach water safety to children without a having a pool? Here are some ideas and video highlights that will help you get started!

Steps

  1. FREE PRIZES. When I am asked to “take the stage” at an event like a Safety Fair or Children’s event at a mall, park, or children’s fair–the first challenge is always getting the kids to the stage. You can answer that challenge quite easily with a handful of free prizes. I usually have some economical goggles, pool toys, etc. and announce . . . “Girls and boys, children of all ages, come on up to the stage for a free water safety presentation. Bring your mom or dad with you too! I have stickers and lots of prizes too! Did you hear that boys and girls . . .free prizes! Come on up now! You’ll gather a crowd of children in a hurry!
  2. STICKERS AND BALLOONS! The moment the children come up to the stage, we start putting stickers on the children and handing them helium balloons—all with our logo and contact information, along with a handout of the SAFER KIDS song (which you will use in a few minutes). Everyone loves free stuff and this certainly does the trick to stir up the excitement.
  3. START YOUR PRESENTATION WITH QUESTION: Once you’ve gathered your audience. You want to engage them by asking a question. I like to ask, “How many of you are SAFE in the water?” Most of them will raise their hand. Then you really pull them in when you shock them with an animated “NO!” I usually act a little silly so I don’t scare them but stress and hammer home this point: “No one . . . not you, not your mom or dad, not even I am safe in the water!” And I can swim across the lake, I can swim a mile without stopping, and I’m even a swim teacher and a lifeguard—but that doesn’t make me safe. What we can be, you and me, is “safer.” Everyone say that . . . “Saferrrrrrrr.” The “r” in safer stands for “risk.” Where there is water, there is risk. But today, I’m going to teach you how you can be safer by following the Safer 3, a layered approach to water safety (that technical comment is aimed toward the parents but we are going to teach it to the children).
  4. TEACH WATER SAFETY WITH A SONG. Continue the presentation by saying, “You have a song sheet with the words to the Safer Kids Song by Jim Reiser. I’m going to teach you that song so you can learn everything you need to know so that you can be safer when you’re in or around the water. Here’s how we’re going to do this: I will sing a verse of the song. Then you will sing that verse with me. Then we’ll talk about what we learned in that verse. Then after we learn each of the verses, we’ll put it all together. Ready, here we go with the first verse (same tune as Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star): “Learning to swim is really cool, so you can have fun playing in the pool, but always make sure there’s a grown up watching you, that’s a safety tip that’s oh so true.” After you sing it, you talk about it. I may say, for example, “So you all agree learning to swim is really cool, right?” They say “yes!” “But what was that really important thing we learned in the first verse? To always make sure there’s a?” They all yell “grown up watching you!” So that’s the idea, and from there I move on to the next verse .
  5. GIVE MORE PRIZES! In addition to keeping the children engaged during the 20-minute presentation with questions and participating in the singing, I will also throw out prizes, i.e., goggles, toys, t-shirts, temporary tattoos, to the children that answer the questions correctly. This technique really keeps them sitting on the edge of their seat!
  6. GIVE CHILDREN HOMEWORK THAT CAN SAVE LIVES! Once I finish teaching the song, I get their attention again: “Now it’s time to give you your homework!” There are two parts two your homework. Part one; this song is my gift to you. Your homework is to practice this song every day until you can sing it without looking at the words. That way I know that you really know the safety rules. Part two . . . I want everyone to close their eyes. Now think of a relative or friend that you really care about (pause). Okay, open your eyes. I want you to teach them the song, just like I taught it to you. Then give your friend your copy of the song as a gift, and give them homework just like I gave you!
  7. SHOW CHILDREN HOW THEY CAN SAVE LIVES BY DOING THEIR HOMEWORK. Over the course of the year, I will teach 2000 children the Safer Kids Song and I will give 2000 children this homework. Here’s a math word problem for you. If 2000 children learn this song and do their homework, thus teaching 2000 more children how to be safer in the water, how many children are now safer in the water? “4000!” I continue this example until we get up to 64,000, sometimes even 128,000, and make my point (plus get them to think and work on their math).
  8. THANK YOU! Lastly, I enthusiastically thank everyone for coming and tell them I hope to see them in one of our “learn to swim” classes soon!

Video

Watch Swim Lessons University’s Jim Reiser teach a group of 2nd graders using many of the strategies discussed in the above article.

Sources and Citations

  • Original Source: www.swimlessonsuniversity.com
  • All proceeds from the SAFER KIDS WATER SAFETY BOOK AND DVD are donated to the Swim for Life Foundation, a non-profit charitable organization that teaches the Safer 3 to prevent childhood drownings.

Article provided by wikiHow, a wiki how-to manual. Please edit this article and find author credits at the original wikiHow article on How to Teach Children Water Safety Without a Swimming Pool. All content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons license.

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,
December 21, 2009 at 8:03 pm Comments (0)

WikiHow names “How to Choose a Swim Instructor” a Rising Star

Jim Reiser’s article,  How to Choose a Swim Instructor, was selected as a “Rising Star” and featured on the WikiHow home page under “new articles.”

By the way, Swim Lessons University’s feature of the week is “Bathtub Baby 101,” How to Make Bath Time Your Baby’s First Swimming Lesson, and it is discounted this week only by 20%!  So you can have it now for just $15.00!

This DVD is especially helpful for parents with babies between the ages 4 weeks and 6 months, helping parents get their baby more prepared for their first swimming lesson.  Because most swim schools don’t start formal instruction until at least 6 months of age, this is the perfect starter DVD for every parent of a newborn baby!

To learn more about it, view the sample video now!

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
December 15, 2009 at 3:06 pm Comments (0)

N.Y. Times Co., About.com, publishes article on Swim Lessons and Dunking Babies

Dunking Infants and Babies is always a big topic of discussion when it comes to learn-to-swim and swimming lessons for infants and toddlers.    Should baby swimmers or toddler swimmers be dunked or not?

View my recent article on About.com and the five rules I train swim instructors to follow when it comes to Infant-toddler swim classes.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
December 10, 2009 at 5:59 pm Comments (0)

The Best Christmas Gift of all . . . Save an infant or toddler’s life!

Did you know that over half of all drownings for babies occur in bath tubs?  According to Safe Kids world wide, that is a fact.   View my FREE YouTube video on Drowning Prevention & Water Safety for infants, toddlers, and young children.

Because we KNOW that infants and toddlers are drowning  in the winter too (because they drown in bath tubs)–PLEASE SHARE THIS VIDEO WITH A FRIEND who has a little one.  You could save a life simply by  “sharing” this information.

You could also go a step further and invest $19.00 in a Christmas gift for a relative or friend, and give them a gift to show you really care– the Bathtub Baby 101 DVD, A Baby’s First Swimming Lesson.  View a free video sample of Bathtub Baby 101 and see all the wonderful tips every mother and father could put to use with for their baby’s baths.

Bathtub Baby 101 also covers

  • How to prepare your bathroom
  • How to prepare your baby
  • How to hold your baby
  • How and what skills to teach your baby
  • How to comfort your baby if he/she cries
  • How to ensure a happy experience

Every parent wants to do everything possible  to protect their baby, which is one of the primary objectives of this DVD.  You want to prepare your baby for a lifelong love affair with the water, and Bathtub Baby 101 is the beginning of that journey.

Lastly, make sure to take advantage of the FREE RESOURCES on our website on the Safer 3, that teaches drowning prevention through education.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
December 4, 2009 at 3:44 pm Comments (0)

YouTube video on “How to Teach Freestyle” PLUS 7 TIPS HERE!

How to Teach Freestyle to Children

from wikiHow – The How to Manual That You Can Edit

Have you ever wandered if there was an easier, step-by-step approach to teaching freestyle to young children? In this article, you will get an inside look at some of “The Swim Professor’s” secrets to success!

Steps

  1. Practice the Freestyle Kick. Start your young students off with a kickboard and make sure they hold it properly, i.e., thumbs on top, fingers on the bottom, arms straight and on top of the board. The chin should be at or near the surface of the water. The bottom of the board should be held just in front of the student’s chest.
  2. Teach the Freestyle Kick Fundamentals. Use cues such as, “fast feet,” “small and fast,” “straighter legs, etc.” By the way, that doesn’t mean the legs should be perfectly straight, but “straighter legs” is still a good correction cue for beginners who have excessive knee bend.
  3. Practice Back Kicking Using Back Kick Progressions. Don’t just kick on the front, practice on the back too. The flutter kick skill practiced on the back transfers nicely to the freestyle flutter kick.
  4. Practice a Variety of Breath Control Drills, i.e., Hopping Frog Bobs and stationary side breaths (as seen in video sample below). Cues such as “Breathe in the mouth, blow out the mouth and the nose” work well.
  5. Teach Side Breathing Drills. Use both stationary and moving drills while using cues like “ear in the water breathe, face in the water blow it out.”
  6. Practice the Freestyle as a Whole and in Parts. While practicing the stroke in parts is an excellent way to isolate different aspects of the stroke, ALWAYS end your lesson by having your students “at least” attempt to put the stroke all together. As seen in the video sample below, I like to use cues like “Breathe, Stroke One, Stroke Two.”
  7. Use Kinesthetic Feedback. No form of feedback is more effective than “kinesthetic feedback,” or allowing your student to “feel” the movement while you manipulate their arms, head position, or legs through a given movement pattern.

Video

Watch Jim Reiser, The Swim Professor, teach young swimmers the freestyle and backstroke, using a variety of skills, drills, and teaching techniques. Cut and paste this link in your browser: http://www.swimlessonsuniversity.com/Swim-Strokes-201-DVD-pluSWIM-STROKES-201.html

Tips

  • Note on the highlight video several teaching techniques, such as the use of cues, feedback, check for understanding, and strategies for maximizing practice time.
  • Note the various drills such as Hopping Frog Bobs, In-line Kick, Back Kick, Stationary Side Breaths, etc. that help break the stroke down into achievable steps and progressions.

Sources and Citations

  • For complete video training courses visit www.swimlessonsuniversity.com

Article provided by wikiHow, a wiki how-to manual. Please edit this article and find author credits at the original wikiHow article on How to Teach Freestyle to Children. All content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons license.

, , , , , , , , , , ,
December 1, 2009 at 5:29 pm Comments (0)

Super Swim Teachers are not found–they are made!

Here is a recent email I received:

Coach Jim,
I don’t know where you find your swim teachers, but I’ve got one thing to say… “Keep up the good work!”

My son Zach has been w/Ms Kali at Still Hopes on the Saturday am class. She has worked the class well to suit his needs.   Due to his autism, sometimes he can have trouble w/things as I am sure you can imagine.  He LOVES the water though, so we wanted to take the opportunity to utilize that to our advantage.

Zach works so hard for Coach Kali & has grown a lot over the last few weeks.  We will all miss swim class until January comes!  It is so awesome as a parent watching him striving for something & be able to acheive it.  I know it would not be possible though, without a dedicated teacher who wants to see my son excel as much as I do. This is Zach’s 2nd class & at both classes he has had wonderful teachers.

I just had to write you & let you know how pleased we are & for you to please give Ms Kali & BIG high-five & a “thank you!”  Please contiue to keep up the GREAT work!!!
– Crystal & John T.

Jim comments:

There is nothing more  rewarding than getting emails like these . . . . but these emails are not an accident.   At The Swim Lessons Company, we don’t find great teachers, we make them!  Yes, we do find good people but that is really the easy part.  The hard part is putting together a staff of teachers who will consistently earn you the testimonials like the one you read above.

HOW DO YOU DO YOU PUT A SUPER STAFF OF SWIM TEACHERS ?
Swim Lessons University was developed to do just that.  In fact,  the DVD video Teaching Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder was instrumental in the comments above on Coach Kali.

Yes, you can find a good water safety instructor here or there.  But if you want to grow your school and create a swim school where you can actually guarantee “learning and laughter,” you can’t expect just to find great swim instructors–you have to make them!  And www.swimlessonsuniversity.com holds the key to your success!

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
November 25, 2009 at 3:57 pm Comments (2)

Watch my new YouTube video from Bathtub Baby 101

Take a few minutes to check out some free video footage from my brand new Bathtub Baby 101 DVD!  Just click Bathtub Baby 101 and you’ll get to watch my wife Heather and I get our 4-month old baby Nolan, ready for his first swimming lesson by using the bathtub.

If you have a newborn baby, I really believe that you will find the information in this DVD to be priceless–just like your baby’s happiness!

Infant Swimming starts in the bath.  Your baby can begin a lifelong love of the water as young as four weeks old.  In addition, babies who learn to love the water in the bathtub will be happier in the swimming pool when they are ready. And most importantly–babies can learn to be safer (NEVER SAFE) in the water!

Never leave your baby unattended in the bathtub. Never leave your baby or child unattended in the swimming pool.   Even if your child can swim.  There’s no substitute for constant supervision.  This DVD is also loaded with Safety Tips for you and there is some free water safety information from the SAFER 3 on my website.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
November 17, 2009 at 3:44 pm Comment (1)

How to Teach a Preschooler to Swim

How to Teach a Preschooler to Swim

from wikiHow – The How to Manual That You Can Edit
Would you like to hear how to make teaching your 3 & 4 year olds more fun and effective? Enjoy some terrific teaching techniques and even watch some FREE video footage from “Swim 101,” How to Teach Young Children to Swim in 8 hours or Less! Oh, and you will also see some really cool “before & after” shots too!

Steps

  1. Use the “Right way vs. the Wrong Way” technique when giving feedback and demonstrating skills (see attached video clip).
  2. Make Learning to Swim Fun! Keep your preschool lessons more interactive and engaging through the use of activities, stories, puppets, songs, and other props (as seen in Swim 101).
  3. Keep the children “on task” by minimizing down time, using clear “start & stop signals,” and using class management skills while keeping the learning environment positive.
  4. Use sound teaching progressions. You’ll see a couple examples in the free video clip, i.e., underwater footage of breath holding and breath control and a back kick support progression. This is just the beginning of all the fundamental skill progressions from the Swim 101 DVD.
  5. Keep your demonstrations short and to the point–but accurate. Preschoolers don’t have a lot of patience BUT they will be motivated to do it just like YOU!
  6. Limit your corrective feedback, and celebrate even the smallest of achievements. Do this, and both the children and their parents will LOVE your class.
  7. Limit formal instruction time to 25-30 minutes for a class of 2-4 children, 20-25 minutes for private lessons. You don’t want your students to be “ready for class to end,” rather you want them leaving your lesson already “looking forward to the next one!”


Video

This video will show you just over 3 minutes of video samples from Jim Reiser’s World Famous “Swim 101” DVD: How to Teach Young Children to Swim and Be Safer in the Water. The entire DVD is available at www.swimlessonsuniversity.com


Tips

  • Visit www.swimlessonsuniversity.com and click Kids Swimmming Lessons to learn more from Jim Reiser, “The Swim Professor!”

Article provided by wikiHow, a wiki how-to manual. Please edit this article and find author credits at the original wikiHow article on How to Teach a Preschooler to Swim. All content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons license.

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
November 16, 2009 at 4:05 pm Comments (0)

Are you frustrated with your swim lesson students?

How to Teach Beginner Swimmers

from wikiHow – The How to Manual That You Can Edit
Are you becoming frustrated with your beginner swimmers? Or even students who can swim BUT are learning a new stroke? When you consider the points and suggestions below you may feel a little better!

Steps

  1. Understand there are 3 Stages of Learning, and when a skill is new the student is in the “Cognitive Stage of Learning.” This stage of learning is characterized by errors that are gross in nature, multiple errors, and an inconsistency in performance.
  2. Because of the above characteristics, you can determine the best approach. That approach consists of keeping your explanations simple and refraining from teaching details.
  3. Use cues or buzzwords that attend to the “whole idea” of the skill and teach your student in more general terms vs. specifics.
  4. Be patient and get excited about the “baby steps” of progress.
  5. Look for things to complement your student on, even if it’s effort. Your swim student’s confidence increases his/her determination. Complement your student twice as much as you correct him.


Video

Sample of author’s DVD on How to Teach Beginners to Swim


Tips

  • Visit www.swimlessonsuniversity.com

Article provided by wikiHow, a wiki how-to manual. Please edit this article and find author credits at the original wikiHow article on How to Teach Beginner Swimmers. All content on wikiHow can be shared under a Creative Commons license.

, , , , , , , , , , , , ,
November 14, 2009 at 11:51 pm Comments (0)

Aquatic International Wanted Me to Invite YOU!

I want to make sure all my Swim Lessons University members, water safety professionals, and swim school friends know about Aquatic International Connect. Make sure to visit AI Connect at: http://aiconnect.ning.com

, , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,
November 12, 2009 at 3:51 pm Comments (0)

« Older PostsNewer Posts »